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. at this hour, we are hearing that several people have been hurt. we'll bring you to the pentagon for the latest on this story, just ahead. >>> also breaking news ahead. the former mayor of new york, ed koch has died. he was 88 years old. a look at his legacy this morning. a controversial, combative, confrontational and brash mayor, and the people of new york city loved him. we'll tell you about that, straight ahead. christine. >>> and the first jobs report of 2013 released in an hour and a half. the numbers for you, what it means for the health of the economy and the jobs market. >> and the defense secretary nominee on the defensive. chuck hagel grilled on capitol hill. did he blow his shot to convince lawmakers that he's the right man for the job? >> friday, february 1st, and "starting point" begins right now. >>> welcome, everybody. breaking news, we start with. two people have died, several people wounded in explosion that has taken place outside the u.s. embassy in ankara, turkey. chris lawrence joins us from the pentagon. >> reporter: good morning, soledad. not much information right now.
in ankara, turkey. chris lawrence joins us from the pentagon. >> reporter: good morning, soledad. not much information right now. turkey authorities are responding to that scene, trying to collect more information. the blast happened just a short while ago, some. news reports out of that area, saw a big flash, heard a big bang. reports of several people wounded near a side gate of the embassy. we're waiting for more information, the u.s., of course, has two major air bases in turkey no, where near the capit capital. soledad. >> thank you, chris, for watching this story. >>> also, we told you just moments ago, the former new york city mayor ed koch has died. he passed away from congestive heart failure. he had really problems with his health over the last many years. mayor koch elected in 1977. he was a judge on the people's court, and he had been hospitalized recent well fluid on his lungs. moved to intensive care yesterday. he was 88 years old. richard socaridies joins us. writer for "new yorker," former aide to president clinton. when i was a kid growing up in long island, mayor koch was
the president's pick to head to the pentagon. why chuck hagel is facing bitter opposition and he's fighting back. >>> and blackberry, a new operating system and a new name. but is it enough to survive? if there was a pill to help protect your eye health as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. music: "make someone happy" music: "make someone happy" ♪it's so important to make someone happy.♪ it's so important to make meone happy.♪ ♪make just one someone happy ♪and you will be happy too. >>> john kerry had no trouble sailing through the senate confirmation process but president obama's pick for defense secretary is facing a much tougher road. the former senator chu
day everybody. . >> chris: i'm chris wallace. the pentagon lifts the ban on women in combat. ♪ >> chris: as the gender barrier falls, there are still questions. whether women should serve in the infantry and special operations. we'll hear from two retired officers. air force colonel martha mcsally, the first female u.s. combat pilot. and, army lieutenant general jerry boykin. then, with -- the hard part, dealing with gun violence to getting america back to work, is congress ready to act? we'll get the latest from two top senators: democrat dick durbin and republican bob corker. plus the president uses his inaugural address to push a liberal agenda. we'll ask our sunday panel how mr. obama is likely to do in his second term. and, our power player of the week: a student of the ways presidents exercise power. all, right now, on fox news sunday. ♪ >> chris: and hello, again, from fox news in washington. american women in the military have served on the front lines, for years. and 152 have been killed in iraq an afghanistan. but when defense secretary panetta lifted the ban o
. androgel 1.62%. >>> a new poll finds the nation strongly in support of the pentagon's announcement that women will be able to serve combat roles in the military. gallup reports 74% in favor of the decision. and the numbers hold up when you break it down by sex. joining me now is mary jennings-hagar. she served two tours of duty in afghanistan, also injured in combat when the helicopter she was piloting was shot down. m.j., such a pleasure to have you on the back. >> good morning, alex. >> in life, as we all know, there are no guarantees of success. not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier. but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> and when you heard that, what did you think? >> that he completely understands where where we're coming from. that's what we're asking for. nobody is asking for fwaurn tgu positions many we're asked for the opportunity to compete, based on skill rather than gender. >> you are one of the women that brought the lawsuit. was it evident when you brought the case that the pentagon would change its stance? >> you know, alex, i have to be honest, i
of the questions have come out of pentagon and have been answered about why it took so long. >> actually not satisfactory. how on september 11th, of all days, with all these warnings didn't we have assets there for seven hours to -- there's so many questions that -- >> so this is not over in your mind at all, not over. >> what did the president do during this period of time? there's two movies been made about getting bin laden with every ticktock of heavy minute. we still don't know what the president was doing, but more importantly, martha, more importantly than that, very quickly, is what's happening all over north africa? what's happening in the middle east? things are deteriorating in a rapid fashion, and it's because of a lack of american leadership. >> deteriorating certainly in north africa. a lot of presence of al qaeda. >> iraq, syria. >> let's go to syria and talk about syria. i actually spoke to secretary of defense leon panetta last week about syria, and he had some pretty alarming things to say. he basically said those shells that the u.s. knew they were loading, artillery s
. >> well, new reaction today to the pentagon's decision to lift the ban on women in combat, which could open up thousands of front line military positions as soon as this year. some critics of the policy though they say that the mixing of genders on the battlefield is a dangerous experiment. advocates though say that the move -- women have already proved themselves in the line of fire. steve centanni is live in washington with more on this. hi, steve. >> that debate continues in women over combat. even though the policy has now changed to acknowledge the reality in today's military. women have been serving in certain combat roles for years. but with the stroke of the pen just last week. outgoing defense secretary leon panetta made it official. women can serve alongside men on the front lines. some opponents say this could lead to problems with unit cohesion and combat readiness. >> my issue here is mixing the genders in infantry units, armor units and special forces units is not a positive. there are many distracters there which puts a burden on the small unit combat leaders, and actual
, but general allen was cleared by the pentagon investigator fors. the fact that the e-mails were sent by a joint account. there was a rush to judgment and i do think that jill kelley was vilified. but not to blame the victim and i want to preface it by saying not to plame the victim, but she could have saved herself a lot of heart ache and a lot of humiliation. it still boggles my mind that she didn't grant you this interview several months ago. in the absence of her side of the story, the media's going to run with the juicier, more salacious story because that's what sells papers. >> that is terrible advice, we're living in an era where the story will not disappear. so it's in your best interest to get the story out as quickly and as susinctly as possible. >> they couldn't really get any facts on her behalf. >> not to distract from the media here, but i do want to -- they had no know what was going to happen here. once someone's name gets out there, it's a juicy story. for a journalist, too often there's a mentality, where there's smoke, there's fire. >> those e-mails that jill kelly
sai may see? >> i think we have to cut waste and not jobs. as you look at the pentagon budget and some of the way that it has been bloated, i think there are lots of opportunities there. i think we have to look at corporate tax loopholes as a significant area where we can increase revenue, but again, we have to have conservatives and republicans in congress that are willing to work with the president instead of the activities that have destroyed the economy. luckily we had a president in place who was pushing back these types of policies. >> jamie: i have to leave it there. >> people are seeing more taxes come out of their paycheck. >> it's like groundhog day. >> jamie: thank you very much. always great to have you on. >> kelly: i think that debate is conning. meantime, a braze a prosecutor in texas, very serious story, new details coming to us on the shooting of an assistant district attorney gunned down in broad daylight outside a courthouse. >> jamie: plus baltimore ravens offensive tackle living beyond the dream. michael orr going from the subject of a hollywood movie. >> appearing
. >> reporter: he insisted he will lead, not follow, at the pentagon and around the world. >> america must engage in the world. not to retreat from the world. >> reporter: for hours, one republican after another accused the two-term nebraska senator of shading his true believes. among their concerns, past statements criticizing israel. >> do you think that it is right that israel was committing a "sickening slaughter" as you said in the senate? >> name one person in your opinion who is intimidated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate? >> your use of intimidation? i should have used influence. >> reporter: more focus on this area, where he looked at more nuclear weapons, even if the u.s. goes firsts. he says he doesn't agree with all the findings. >> why would you ever put your name on a report that is inconsistent with what you're telling us today? >> reporter: but the big flash point? iran, where he stumbled talking about basic u.s. policy, calling iran a "legitimate government". >> i do not see iran as a legitimate government. i would like your thoughts on that. >> what i mea
islamic rebels in mali by deploying troops and drones to the country right next-door. our pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence, is joining us with details. chris, how many u.s. forces, first of all, are we talking about? >> potentially, hundreds, wolf. and here's why. niger's ambassador to the u.s. basically confirms to cnn that his country is going to allow the u.s. military to place drones in niger. a u.s. official tells me that if that were to happen, you'd have to have an infrastructure there. in other words, you'd have to have operators to fly and guide the drones, as well as u.s. military security personnel to protect that infrastructure. so that's where you could get into the hundreds of boots on the ground. these drones would be unarmed, they would primarily be used for surveillance, spying on the al qaeda groups operating in places like mali. right now, the u.s. has drone bases in ja bu ty and southern europe, but the drones can't fly that far, so it's difficult to get accurate intelligence on what's going on with the militants there, wolf. >> how big is a threat of al q
including working at the n.s.c. on detail, at nato headquarters, brought at the middle east and the pentagon. he was advisor to four presidents, president obama asked him to lead his afghanistan-pakistan policy review in early 2009 and he did that for a couple of months before happily, for us, returning to brookings. bruce has written already two books in the time he's been here, actually a third is about to come out, i'll mention that in just a second, but the first two were about al qaeda and then about the u.s.-pakistan relationship "the deadly embrace." . his new book, coming out next month is "avoiding armageddon" and it's the story about the u.s.-india-pakistan relationship and crisis management over the last half century or so. general stan mcchrystal is a 1976 graduate of west point. spent 34 years in the u.s. army. retiring as a four-star general in the summer of 2010. he has been commander in afghanistan. he was the director of the joint staff. but perhaps in military circles, most of all, as i mentioned, this five-year period at joint special operations command makes him memorable
their motivations are. more on that in moment. first, too chris lawrence at the pentagon. the turkish government says it does have more sense of who the attacker was. >> yeah, erin, they think it's a man ichevich sham li, member of the revolution people's liberation party. they say he trained in europe how to make bombs and has attacked turkish military and police officials before. right now they're doing dna tests to confirm his i. dix. the group is a throwback to the cold war, a far left revolutionary group that wants to overthrow turkey's government and establish some sort of communist state. >> why would they target the u.s. embassy? >> they are anti-capitalist. and they're very, very opposed to the u.s. and nato. analysts say probably two reasons for this attack. one is to embarrass the turkish government. two is to protest the presence of u.s. patriot missiles on turkish soil. right now, 400 american troops are in turkey and they are moving that patriot missile battery into position on turkey's border with syria. turkey requested that help because of the mortars flying in from syria and th
. >>> keeping up with the changing times the pentagon will boost its cyber security staff. according to "washington post" another 4,000 people will be assigned to help counter increasing threats against government computer networks. officials say they intend to focus their efforts on networks outside the u.s. [ male announcer ] how do you make america's favorite recipes? just begin with america's favorite soups. bring out chicken broccoli alfredo. or best-ever meatloaf. go to campbellskitchen.com for recipes, plus a valuable coupon. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec-d®. powerful relief of nasal congestion and other allergy symptoms -- all in one pill. zyrtec-d®. at the pharmacy counter. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forgiveness if you qualify, where your rates won't go up due to your first accident, and new car replacement, where, if you total your new car, we gi
, a new poll finds that the nation is strongly in support of the pentagon's announcement this week that women will now be able to serve in combat roles in the military. gallup report said 74% of people are in favor of the decision. those numbers hold up when you break them down by men and women as well. let me bring in democratic congress woman loretta sanchez, senior female member of the house armed services committee and homeland security committee. thank you so much for being here with us. why now is this time right time to do this? is it overdue would you say? is there something about it happening right now that's good timing? >> well, t.j., i've been fighting for about the last five or six years with a bill in the house to recognize what we already know. our women have been fighting in iraq and afghanistan. there is no frontline. everywhere is the frontline. they've been in combat. they've been killed. they're p.o.w.s. they've been wounded. and yet they have never received the recognition north pay nor the promotions due to the fact that they would be in combat. so it's long o
that the pentagon may have plans for a surgical strike on iran's nuclear facilities. the president of a foundation that focuses on nuclear weapons policy, joe thank you so much for being here. we have two issues to take up. let's begin with iran. what do you think of this? it only makes sense but to hear it from ehud barak, a lot of people are paying attention that u.s. has plans for a surgical strike on their facilities. what do you make of that. >> most experts interpreted that as israel sort of backing away from a threat of launching a full-scale military attack itself. he was saying, there's a lot of other possibilities here. we don't have to go in with a sledge hammer. this is a word he used. you can go in with a scalpel. the u.s. has military scalpels it's prepared. this sosk true. options that would perhaps take out a single facility or a critical node in the infrastructure. this is a good sign for us that the israelis are willing to give diplomacy more of a chance. you heard senator kerry in his testimony just this week to be secretary of state asserting that he wants to give diplomacy a c
into a pentagon badly in need of more reform, more budget cutting, and who better to do that, than someone with the kind of credibility with the troops that chuck hagel has. >> chuck schumer, speaking of chucks, another chuck, ari, chuck schumer, as you know, a very strong supporter of israel, very tough on iran and its nuclear program. he had a private meeting with hagel, emerged strongly endorsing hagel, saying he'll vote to confirm him. you read that long statement that schumer put out on what he was told by hagel during the course of that private meeting. i rey sum that's reassuring. i assume that's reassuring to you. is it reassuring enough for republicans to vote to confirm him? >> no, i think hagel has broken the land speed record for the most apologies on a way to a hopeful confirmation. i've never heard of a nominee who has apologized to so many different people for so many different positions he's took over his career in order for him to get confirmed. i suspect this is more a confirmation conversion than anything heartfelt from hagel. that's why he's saying this. explaining away
's terrible. in "the washington post," the number of people working on s cybersecurity for the pentagon is going to increase fivefold. the department of defense's cyber command which mainly focuses on kpourt systems is going to increase to nearly 5,000 troops and civilians. the retooled program will include combat mission forces who may help military commanders by disabling an encommand and control system before a military attack. tell us about it, richard. >> both cyber defense and cyber offense. you speak to anyone in the military in the intelligence community, this is the first thing they talk about. it's an area of great advantage for us. look at the way we use computer viruses. we can organize information in ways that others can't. on the other hand, everything we do as a society, everything we do as a military is now based upon cyber. so we're both the best but also the most vulnerable ultimately. so the idea that we're throwing enormous resources at this, this is no coincidence. it's not a one-time thing. this is now the future. >>> from our parade of papers, "the kansas city sta
the joint chiefs of staff. this was not imposed on them by any civilians in the pentagon or the white house. the joint chiefs recommended it because women are already in combat. let's start paying the ones who are in combat, what they deserve >> it is not like every woman in the military will be in combat. you've got to earn it. there's going to be tests. i mean come on, they're not just going to send people out there who aren't qualified. we don't have time to talk about hillary's testimony on the hill last week. just the floodgates of right wing misogyny that that opened up. preview of what's to come, i think. >> john: i think you're right eric. they had eight years of hating her as first lady. 12 years of loving her as a senator and secretary of state and now they're looking at 2016, they're going to hate her all over again to hurt her so chris christie, who they also hate, can become president. one more thing about the women in combat. there's so many men in the military who aren't fit for combat. there were so many women who are ready for combat and haven't been allowed to serve. i wan
. martha: the pentagon is inching closer and closer to the date when they will see devastating budget cuts in our military. why one lawmaker says he thinks this is going to happen. bill: and this little guy becomes iran's latest hero. shot into space they say, we'll take about his journey into the great unknown or at least what iran says. martha: i wonder what he'll report back? ♪ some people call me the space cowboy, some wall me the gangster of love. ♪ some people call me maurice, because i speak of the poppatis of love. ♪ ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. progress-oh! -oh! -oh! oh! oh! ♪ wh do you know? oh! ♪ bacon? -oh! -oh! oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your story for a chance to win a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. go to facebook.com/progresso to enter. bill: there are two people recovering from hypothermia after their small plane crashed and s*eupbd in th sank
of the doctors who performed it. first, nbc's pentagon correspondent, jim milkuloklasz has the story. >> modern medicine, young man's coverage and determination to overcome an unimaginable adversity. brendan marrocco sat before a group of reporters. >> i never accepted the fact that i didn't have arms. now that i have them again it's almost as if it never happened. >> reporter: as a soldier in iraq he lost both his arms and legs to a roadside bomb, first quadruple amputee in the u.s. military. after four years of therapy, he mastered his artificial limbs, all four of them. but listen to him as he comes to grips with the loss of one, but definitely not the other. >> i hated not having arms. i was all right with not having legs. not having arms takes so much away from you out of even your personality. >> reporter: last december, a team of doctors at johns hop kins, working 13 hours straight, transplanted two arms from a deceased anonymous donor. to reduce the threat of rejecti rejection, the donor's bone marrow was also transplanted. while the motion is limited and he still has no feeling in his
by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- that is what we call a leading answer. perception need to catch up with reality. the department has moved light years ahead. president obama has continued to ask congress for the resources we need to do that. women talk about the interaction with the private-sector, which we do in a number of areas already -- when we talk about the interaction with the private sector, which we do in a number of areas already, the part that controls the core infrastructure with our statutory irresponsibility to help protect the nation's infrastructure. when we talk about linking those things together from a security perspective, we are not talking about a regulatory overlaid. we're talking about how do you take part of our country that is -
. here to explain this is former pentagon official, who directed technology acquisitions for the army under president obabush and obama. and this is key battery technology and the u.s. taxpayers paid a quarter billion dollars for that may end up in the hands of china? how does this work? >> good morning, tucker, and the rest of the material i'm with the strategic material advisors council which i co-founded and we stand in stark opposition to the sale of 123 battery to the chinese group company. this sale is occurring the at a bankruptcy proceeding because a-123 filed for bankruptcy in october of 2012. we're calling on the department of the and its committee on the foreign investment in the united states to do its job and to deny this sale. >> tucker: and so why is this specific battery technology potentially so useful to the chinese? >> well, this is -- we're talking about very, very high end, lithium ion batteries, phosphate batteries. these are not your father's and my father's c and d batteries that you buy in the drug store. these are very, very high-end storage units that are us
-- september 1, 2001. there is smoke in the ground in new york. the pentagon is broken. what do we know about al qaeda @? did we know that members of this network, all this information we take for granted now? >> we did not know that much. we did not know who was responsible for 9/11. we had a few assets of the provided us some peripheral information. we did not know very much. it took a long time for us to be in a position to really learn what was going on. in march of 2002, we captured al zabeta. we recognized that we had to do something different. contrary to what some people are saying, he initially provided a couple of pieces of information. then he shut down. we knew they were coming after us in the second wave of attacks. we knew that they had a nuclear program. they had a biological weapons program. we thought we needed to do something different. that is when the enhanced interrogations program came into existence. he went through the program, started in august of 2002 for 20 days or so. if you later -- if you sit recaptured a major player. he was a go-between. this was the key to all
military leaders the pentagon to cut from unsuccessful and outdated programs and put more money into the most successful and important programs. with that said, the only thing worse than the defense cuts and sequestration is no cuts at all. if we don't have the sequestration cuts at the top line revenue level went we will increase the debt ceiling with almost nothing to show for it. part of the reasons why the house republicans this week, extended the debt ceiling for three months to feel out paul ryan and his team to draft a budget that gets us balanced in 10 years but also protects the department of defense from further cuts because they have already been cut by $500 billion. >> do you get the idea, do you get the sense that americans are tired of world business. that doing some business here at home is gaining traction with people. are they world leadership weary? is the american hour ticking to a close? >> i think there is a degree of war weariness among the american people. it is not surprising. when your commander in chief is war weary you will be as well. when i was leadi
, but first nbc's pentagon reporter has this inspiring story. good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. this is truly a remarkable story of modern medicine, and a young man's courage and determination to overcome an imaginable diversity. ferdinand marco sat before a news conference flexing his arms, newly transplanted just six weeks ago. >> i never accepted the fact i didn't have arms, so now that i have them again, it's almost like it never happened. >> reporter: as a soldier in iraq, he lost his arms and legs in a roadside bomb, the first double amputee in the u.s. military. after weeks of therapy in a military hospital, he mastered his new limbs, all four of them. but listen to morocco when he talks about the loss of one but not the other. >> i hated not having arms. i was all right not having legs. not having arms takes so much away from you, even your personality. >> reporter: so last december a team of doctors at johns hopkins working 13 hours straight transplanted two arms from a deceased anonymous donor. due to the threat of rejection, the bone marrow was also transplanntran tr
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)

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